Hyperbole




Students unknowingly use hyperbole throughout the day when they bemoan the tons of homework assigned or how the computer took an eternity to load. A hyperbole is an exaggerated statement not meant to be taken literally, but used for emphasis. Hyperbole is used in everyday spoken language and even literature, like tall tales.

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Although students may be able to use hyperbole in their day-to-day speech, teachers should still create and implement hyperbole lessons to help students develop a greater understanding of the figurative language concept. VocabularySpellingCity provides teachers with additional resources to enhance their hyperbole lesson plan. Resources include ready-made word lists, interactive learning games, and free printable worksheets.

Although the term hyperbole is not referenced in the ELA Common Core Standards until the sixth grade, elementary students will encounter hyperbolic language in literature long before middle school. In second grade, students are introduced to folk tales. A particular type of folk tale, the tall tale, incorporates hyperbole into storytelling, as events and elements are widely exaggerated. Elementary school students will be exposed to the stories of Pecos Bill, Paul Bunyan,The Legend of John Henry, and The Legend of Johnny Appleseed. So elementary school teachers will need to review the concept of hyperbole during readings.

K-12 word study for hyperbole should include many examples appropriate to each grade level so students become more familiar with interpreting nonliteral meanings of words and phrases in spoken and written English. Students can also practice using hyperbole in sentences they create themselves. VocabularySpellingCity offers Sentence Writing Practice, which allows students to use hyperbole in their own writing.

In addition, the activity Paragraph Writing Practice can be used to further enhance a tall tale lesson plan. Students can be assigned to create their own tall tale and can use hyperbole in their stories.

Learn about more types of figurative language: idioms, metaphors, personification and similes.

View Common Core State Standards Related to HyperboleClose

Common Core State Standards Related to Hyperbole

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.3.5.a
Distinguish the literal and nonliteral meanings of words and phrases in context (e.g., take steps).

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5.a
Interpret figurative language, including similes and metaphors, in context.

CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.5.5
Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances, in word meanings.

Hyperbole – Elementary School Examples
  • The whole world was staring at me.
  • I can smell mom’s brownies a mile away.
  • I’m so hungry, I could eat a horse.
  • I have a ton of homework.
  • He snores louder than a freight train.

 K-5 Hyperbole Practice Worksheet (Unscramble Sentences)

Hyperbole – Middle School Examples
  • I have a thousand things to do today.
  • His garlic breath could knock over an elephant.
  • I’ve seen this movie a thousand times.
  • The letter took forever to arrive.
  • You could have knocked me over with a feather.

 6-8 Hyperbole Practice Worksheet (MatchIt Sentences)

Hyperbole – High School Examples
  • I don’t have two cents to rub together.
  • The teacher has a mountain of tests to grade.
  • He runs faster than the speed of light.
  • It took me light years to finish this project.
  • I’d move mountains for you.

 9-12 Hyperbole Practice Worksheet (WhichWord Sentences)

VocabularySpellingCity.com provides word lists, printables, and interactive games and activities that give students the opportunity to distinguish literal and nonliteral meanings for words and to interpret hyperbole in context.

Try Sentence Writing Practice with the Elementary School Hyperbole list.